Six Tips for a Work-From-Home Policy That Works

Here goes nothing… or maybe everything.

Blanchard LeaderChat

work from homeMarissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!, is being scrutinized and second-guessed for her decision to not allow employees to work from home starting in June. It’s easy for pundits to take pot shots from afar, but speaking as a manager who has struggled to find the right balance with this same issue, I’ve learned there isn’t a one size fits all policy that works for every employee in every organization.

One thing is certain – trust is at the heart of a successful work from home policy. If your work from home policy isn’t based on the premise that your employees are trustworthy, and if the boundaries of the policy don’t nurture and protect trust, you’ll find that allowing employees to work from home will be an ongoing source of suspicion, resentment, and irritation.

Working from home can provide tremendous benefits to both the employer and the employee. Studies have shown…

View original post 455 more words

2 thoughts on “Six Tips for a Work-From-Home Policy That Works

  1. Hey Valerie…followed you over here from Blanchard. For whatever time you must spend at the office, have you thought about trying the techniques for managing your time, and training your coworkers, boss, etc. to respect your need to have uninterrupted time, as described in “The Pomodoro Technique”?

    http://www.pomodorotechnique.com/

    It does sound like you would benefit from an office with walls and a door, but if you can’t get that, and your request to telecommute is denied, you might at least achieve some improved productivity by using this technique, and educating your colleagues about it. When you are “on a Pomodoro” you could perhaps have a visual sign that people can see from across the office, so they don’t approach you.

    I am giving it a try in my office and I have found benefits already in that coworkers don’t bother me with every little thing. I am training them to wait a maximum of 25 minutes until I am done a Pomodoro and taking a short break.

    You can learn about the method for free…all the info you need is on their web site.

    Good luck,
    Kelly

Comments? Leave them here.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s